Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Institutions of the MarketOrganizations, Social Systems, and Governance$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alexander Ebner and Nikolaus Beck

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199231423

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231423.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 April 2019

Different Paths of Industry Evolution: Timing of Entry, Legitimation, and Competition Spillovers Across Countries

Different Paths of Industry Evolution: Timing of Entry, Legitimation, and Competition Spillovers Across Countries

Chapter:
(p.221) 10 Different Paths of Industry Evolution: Timing of Entry, Legitimation, and Competition Spillovers Across Countries
Source:
The Institutions of the Market
Author(s):

Filippo Carlo Wezel

Christophe Boone

Arjen van Witteloostuijn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231423.003.0011

This chapter has two main goals: (a) to model some of the variety of evolutionary paths of organizational populations empirically observed and (b) elaborate on a model refinement that captures the existence of legitimation and competition spillovers across national populations. In doing so, it contributes to an emerging branch of organizational ecology concerned with evolutionary processes taking place at the international level. A model is proposed that points to cross-country differences in timing of entry and development as key drivers of the country-specific processes of legitimation and competition. It distinguishes pioneer from follower countries, and uses this distinction to advance how observable patterns of population evolution — that is, density growth and decline — may be related to and sustained by spillover effects across countries. The proposed model is largely inspired by that literature in biology, in which the form and the strength of density-dependent evolution are modelled.

Keywords:   organizational evolution, organizational ecology, density-dependent evolution, legitimation, competition

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .