Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Family mattersDesigning, analysing and understanding family based studies in life course epidemiology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Deborah A. Lawlor and Gita D. Mishra

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199231034

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231034.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 April 2019

Statistical considerations in intergenerational studies

Statistical considerations in intergenerational studies

Chapter:
(p.195) Chapter 10 Statistical considerations in intergenerational studies
Source:
Family matters
Author(s):

Dorothea Nitsch

Gita D Mishra

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231034.003.0010

Intergenerational data necessarily reflect the time and place that the different generations of participants were living in. This chapter aims first to introduce simple concepts to provide an understanding of the founding assumptions and principles, before moving on to more complex analytic methods. As the objectives of analyses may vary substantially across intergenerational studies, there is no easy guideline for analyses, except perhaps that some a priori clarity on the main associations of interest is crucial. Since parents and their offspring are genetically related, intergenerational studies are to some extent genetically informative even if no genotyping was performed. Much of the analyses are concerned with identifying or unravelling the relationship between outcomes and genetic and environmental factors. Ways of handling missing data as well as approaches to deal with non-paternity are also discussed. Illustrative examples are drawn from the two cohort studies.

Keywords:   life course epidemiology, family studies, intergenerational studies, offspring outcome, multilevel models, path analysis, non-paternity, statistical methods

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .