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Global JusticeA Cosmopolitan Account$
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Gillian Brock

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199230938

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199230938.001.0001

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Immigration

Immigration

Chapter:
(p.190) 8 Immigration
Source:
Global Justice
Author(s):

Gillian Brock (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199230938.003.0008

Chapter 8 discusses whether easing restrictions on immigration would be helpful in advancing global justice. Some particular kinds of migration policies (such as, those that have strict term limits, or create net benefits for those in the home and host countries) might constitute progress. However we must also appreciate the significant drawbacks that also frequently accompany increased immigration (such as brain drain, worsening health, or negative economic consequences). The chapter considers such detrimental effects, and shows how we can mitigate some of these if migration is carefully managed. Examining and addressing root causes of why people want to emigrate is, all things considered, a better strategy. This chapter indicates what such a deeper analysis would yield. The chapter argues that increased immigration by itself, and in the absence of other measures, would not necessarily improve the prospects for global justice.

Keywords:   immigration, emigrate, migration, migration policies, restrictions on immigration, global justice, brain drain, health, economic consequences

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