Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Creation of States in International Law$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James R. Crawford

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199228423

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199228423.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 June 2018

Statehood and Recognition

Statehood and Recognition

Chapter:
(p.3) Chapter 1 Statehood and Recognition
Source:
The Creation of States in International Law
Author(s):

JAMES CRAWFORD

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199228423.003.0001

At the beginning of the 20th century, there were some fifty acknowledged States. By 2005, this number rose to exactly 192 States. The emergence of so many new States represents one of the major political developments of the 20th century. It has changed the character of international law and the practice of international organisations, and has been one of the more important sources of international conflict. But the fact that some development is of importance in international relations does not entail that it is regulated by international law. Fundamentally, the question is whether international law is itself, in one of its most important aspects, a coherent or complete system of law. This work investigates whether, and to what extent, the formation and existence of States is regulated by international law, and is not simply a ‘matter of fact’.

Keywords:   statehood, recognition, international law, 20th century, international conflict, international relations

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .