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Lessons from Pension Reform in the Americas$
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Stephen J. Kay and Tapen Sinha

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199226801

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199226801.001.0001

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Pension Reform and Gender Inequality

Pension Reform and Gender Inequality

Chapter:
(p.134) Chapter 5 Pension Reform and Gender Inequality
Source:
Lessons from Pension Reform in the Americas
Author(s):

Michelle Dion

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199226801.003.0006

This chapter examines an effect of pension reform that was largely unanticipated, or at least seldom explicitly considered, when many pension reforms were being adopted throughout Latin America: the effects of privatization on women's welfare. First, it provides a brief overview of the sources of gender inequalities and discusses elements of pension policy affecting gendered welfare. Second, it explains and critiques the insurance-based criteria for evaluating the gender effects of pension reform. Third, it offers an alternative set of criteria for evaluating gender outcomes based on three dimensions: women's ability to claim social citizenship rights, gender stratification, and the distribution of welfare responsibility among the market, state, and family. Finally, it compares interpretations of the gendered effects of pension reform in Latin America based on insurance and distributive assumptions to illustrate why disagreements in the literature persist.

Keywords:   Latin America, pension system, women and pensions, privatization, gender inequality, welfare policy

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