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The Decolonization of International Law
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The Decolonization of International Law: State Succession and the Law of Treaties

Matthew Craven

Abstract

The issue of state succession continues to be a vital and complex focal point for public international lawyers, yet it has remained strangely resistant to effective articulation. The formative period in this respect was that of decolonization: a period in which international lawyers were not only faced with the task of managing a process of profound political and legal change, but also the transformation of their own discipline (in which the promises of the UN Charter would be realized in an international community of sovereign peoples). Later, in the 1990s, a series of territorial adjustments ... More

Keywords: decolonization, international law, UN Charter, self-determination, law of succession, imperialism, state succession, Waldock Reports, Vienna Conference

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2007 Print ISBN-13: 9780199217625
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199217625.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Matthew Craven, author
Professor of International Law, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London