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Neuroimaging of Human Memory
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Neuroimaging of Human Memory: Linking cognitive processes to neural systems

Frank Rösler, Charan Ranganath, Brigitte Röder, and Rainer Kluwe

Abstract

In the past twenty years, neuroimaging has provided us with a wealth of data regarding human memory. This book asks: to what extent can neuroimaging constrain, support or falsify psychological theories of memory? To what degree is research on the biological bases of memory actually guided by psychological theory? In looking at the close interaction between neuroimaging research and psychological theories of human memory, this book presents an exploration of imaging research on human memory, along with accounts of the significance of these findings with regard to fundamental psychological quest ... More

Keywords: neuroimaging, human memory, psychological theory, brain imaging tools, working memory, learning, consolidation, retrieval, functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2009 Print ISBN-13: 9780199217298
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199217298.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Frank Rösler, editor
Professor for Experimental and Biological Psychology, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany

Charan Ranganath, editor
Associate Professor, Center for Neuroscience and Department of Psychology, University of California at Davis, Davis, USA

Brigitte Röder, editor
Professor for Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology, University of Hamburg, Germany

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Contents

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Part 1 Setting the stage

Part 2 Learning and consolidation

Part 3 Working memory control processes and storage

Part 4 Long-term memory representations

Part 5 Control processes during encoding and retrieval