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Securing Civilization?The EU, NATO and the OSCE in the Post-9/11 World$
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Alexandra Gheciu

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199217229

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199217229.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.155) 5 Conclusion
Source:
Securing Civilization?
Author(s):

Alexandra Gheciu (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199217229.003.0005

The final chapter explores the ways in which the EU, NATO, and the OSCE have related to each other in their (theoretically joint) effort to prevent and combat international terrorism. Drawing on the work of sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, it argues that important instances of cooperation among NATO, the EU, and the OSCE have been accompanied by a dynamic of competition, as each institution has sought to secure a privileged position in the changing field of security by invoking and seeking to further enhance its symbolic and material capital. This chapter also reflects on the ways in which the activities carried out by the EU, NATO, and the OSCE have further contributed to transformations in the field of security and, more broadly, to changes in norms of governance in the Euro-Atlantic area, for instance by participating in the process of blurring the boundaries between policing/defence activities, public/private spheres, and (re)constituting categories of protector/protected. Through their practices, NATO, the EU, and the OSCE have also complicated questions about the acceptable limits of exceptional treatments of exclusion that target individuals and groups deemed as enemies of the community based on liberal-democratic values.

Keywords:   capital, EU, NATO, OSCE, rendition, risk-management, security community, security field, symbolic power

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