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The Plain Man's Pathways to HeavenKinds of Christianity in Post-Reformation England, 1570–1640$
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Christopher Haigh

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199216505

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216505.001.0001

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Philagathus: The Godly and the Rest

Philagathus: The Godly and the Rest

Chapter:
(p.122) 6 Philagathus: The Godly and the Rest
Source:
The Plain Man's Pathways to Heaven
Author(s):

CHRISTOPHER HAIGH

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216505.003.0007

This chapter focuses on the relationship between the profane and the godly. Philagathus knew well that the profane hated the godly. Theologus knew it too — ‘many of them despise the word of God, and hate all the zealous professors of it’. As he told Antilegon the caviller, ‘if a man give himself to the word and prayer, reformeth his family and abstaineth from the gross sins of the world, you will by and by say he is an hypocrite’ . At the Kettering lecture, Robert Bolton warned that the unregenerate would despise the true professors — ‘You see these fellows, which make such a show of forwardness and purity, what they are? none so covetous, none so uncharitable, none so unmerciful and cruel in their dealings as they’.

Keywords:   Philagathus, profane, godly living, Antilegon the caviller, Robert Bolton

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