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Receptive Ecumenism and the Call to Catholic LearningExploring a Way for Contemporary Ecumenism$
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Paul Murray

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199216451

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216451.001.0001

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Anglicanism and the Conditions for Communion—A Response to Cardinal Kasper

Anglicanism and the Conditions for Communion—A Response to Cardinal Kasper

Chapter:
(p.373) 26 Anglicanism and the Conditions for Communion—A Response to Cardinal Kasper
Source:
Receptive Ecumenism and the Call to Catholic Learning
Author(s):

Nicholas Sagovsky

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216451.003.0031

This chapter presents a response to Cardinal Kasper's question: How it is possible ‘to designate Scripture and the Apostles’ and Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creeds as normative in the Chicago–Lambeth Quadrilateral, but to disregard the binding force of the subsequent living tradition? It argues that Anglicans, though they do not define, or make explicit, the binding force of the living tradition, as Roman Catholics do, by no means disregard it. At the moment they are far from united on how that ‘binding force’ may be discerned, but they cannot see in other Christian traditions the specific gift or gifts that can resolve this crisis in communion.

Keywords:   Anglicans, Catholics, unity, communion, Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creeds, Chicago–Lambeth Quadrilateral

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