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Social Democracy Inside OutPartisanship and Labor Market Policy in Advanced Industrialized Democracies$
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David Rueda

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199216352

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216352.001.0001

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The Preferences of Insiders and Outsiders: Testing the Model's Assumptions about Individual Interests

The Preferences of Insiders and Outsiders: Testing the Model's Assumptions about Individual Interests

Chapter:
(p.36) 3 The Preferences of Insiders and Outsiders: Testing the Model's Assumptions about Individual Interests
Source:
Social Democracy Inside Out
Author(s):

David Rueda (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216352.003.0003

This chapter has two main goals: to produce data that provide a complete picture of the preferences of insiders, outsiders, and upscale groups; and to test whether these preferences fit into the partisanship model proposed in this book. The chapter proceeds as follows. The first section provides a brief explanation of the survey used in the analysis and the way insiders, outsiders, and upscale groups have been categorized. The second section offers a detailed explanation of the individual preferences implied in the insider-outsider model and an initial and descriptive assessment of their accuracy. The third section contains a systematic multilevel analysis of the individual preferences of insiders, outsiders, and upscale groups. The fourth section introduces the two macro factors which, in Chapter 2, were hypothesized to affect the differences between insiders and outsiders: job security and corporatism. The final section presents multilevel maximum likelihood models estimating the effects of job security and corporatism. The results corroborate the model's claims: lower levels of employment protection do indeed make insiders more like outsiders (i.e., more supportive of labour market policy). The results support an economic insider-outsider interpretation of the effects of corporatism on insider preferences.

Keywords:   insider-outsider model, upscale groups, individual preferences, job security, corporatism, multilevel maximum likelihood models, labour market policy

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