Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
With Voice and PenComing to Know Medieval Song and How it Was Made$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Leo Treitler

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199214761

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199214761.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 April 2019

The Marriage of Poetry and Music in Medieval Song

The Marriage of Poetry and Music in Medieval Song

Chapter:
(p.457) CHAPTER 17 The Marriage of Poetry and Music in Medieval Song
Source:
With Voice and Pen
Author(s):

Leo Treitler

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199214761.003.0017

The chapter explores the relationship between poetry and music. It argues that a poem, like a melody, is a sounding phenomenon, and it is as both sounding phenomena and syntactical orders that poetry and melody engage one another. This depends on a number of basic melodic principles that constitute the main resources for creating a dynamic of stability and instability and of tension and repose, for motivating continuity and closure, correspondence to dynamics of contrast, amplification, and reference in the phonetic, syntactic, and semantic aspects of language. This is demonstrated through a comparison of two manuscript transmissions of a melody from Abelard's Dolorum solatium, David's lament over Saul and Jonathan.

Keywords:   medieval music, poem, Abelard, Dolorum solatium, poetry and melody

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .