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OrangutansGeographic Variation in Behavioral Ecology and Conservation$
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Serge A. Wich, S Suci Utami Atmoko, Tatang Mitra Setia, and Carel P. van Schaik

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199213276

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199213276.001.0001

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Taxonomy, geographic variation and population genetics of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans

Taxonomy, geographic variation and population genetics of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans

Chapter:
(p.1) CHAPTER 1 Taxonomy, geographic variation and population genetics of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans
Source:
Orangutans
Author(s):

Benoît Goossens

Lounès Chikhi

Mohd. Fairus Jalil

Sheena James

Marc Ancrenaz

Isabelle Lackman-Ancrenaz

Michael W. Bruford

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199213276.003.0001

This chapter reviews the published data and discusses the taxonomy and population genetics of orangutans. The orangutan was traditionally classified as two separate subspecies, Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus in Borneo and P. p. abelii in Sumatra. Recent molecular data have suggested a re-classification into two separate species: P. pygmaeus in Borneo and P. abelii in Sumatra. Moreover, three subspecies have been described on Borneo Island: P. p. pygmaeus in Sarawak and west Kalimantan, P. p. morio in Sabah and east Kalimantan and P. p. wurmbii in central and south Kalimantan. Despite this, little is known about the intra-subspecific variation between isolated Bornean populations and among the Sumatran populations. More data are needed, which should include a large sampling of all geographically separated populations in Borneo and Sumatra in order to provide a more complete genetic information database.

Keywords:   geographic isolation, molecular, non-invasive genetics, population genetics, taxonomy

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