Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Classics and National Cultures$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Susan A. Stephens and Phiroze Vasunia

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199212989

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212989.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 March 2019

Auerbach, Homer, and the Jews

Auerbach, Homer, and the Jews

Chapter:
(p.235) 12 Auerbach, Homer, and the Jews
Source:
Classics and National Cultures
Author(s):

James I. Porter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212989.003.0013

The chapter examines Erich Auerbach's contrastive analysis from 1942 of Homer and the Jewish Old Testament, situating that analysis firmly in its immediate historical context of German fascism, anti‐Semitism, and exile. The thesis is that by indexing the present historical moment in his reading, Auerbach, the displaced German Jew in Istanbul, is historicizing philology. At the same time he is inverting the political polarities of philology, not least by contrasting the two treatments (Homeric, biblical‐Jewish) of time, truth, and revelation in the two traditions that he is less comparing than critically pitting against each other. And he is undertaking all this in opposition to the ingrained tendencies of an anti‐Semitic classical philology and in the context of efforts in Germany to de‐Judaize Christianity. While he is remembered today as the founder of comparative literature, Auerbach is in fact Judaizing philology; that is, he is constructing a new oppositional Jewish philology that departs dramatically from the conventions of classical philology and romance philology.

Keywords:   anti‐semitism, Ernst Curtius, Ernst Robert Curtius, Dante, Deutsche Christen, J. G. Droysen, fascism, Walter Grundmann, Adolf Hitler, Istanbul, Jews, Judaism, Nazis, Old Testament, Giambattista Vico, F. A. Wolf

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .