Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Somoza and RooseveltGood Neighbour Diplomacy in Nicaragua, 1933-1945$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Andrew Crawley

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199212651

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212651.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 October 2018

Good Neighbour Economics in Nicaragua, 1933–1936

Good Neighbour Economics in Nicaragua, 1933–1936

Chapter:
(p.72) 3 Good Neighbour Economics in Nicaragua, 1933–1936
Source:
Somoza and Roosevelt
Author(s):

ANDREW CRAWLEY

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212651.003.0004

This chapter discusses good neighbour economics that existed between US and Nicaragua between 1933-1936. The depression shifted US attention from purely political matters to economics; this prompted the US to reconsider its existing trade agreement with Nicaragua, in favour of the US. The Nicaraguan president Sacasa went to Congress and lobbied for a proposed accord in which Nicaragua would cut duties on nine US exports and bind the rates on another fifteen, in return for which Nicaragua was granted one tariff cut (on Peru balsam) and the nine items that constituted 90% of its exports to the United States were allowed to remain on the free list. Sacasa agreed to the treaty in an attempt to gain the favour of Washington.

Keywords:   Nicaragua, tariff cut, Sacasa, US exports, Washington, depression, trade agreement, duties

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .