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Management ConsultancyBoundaries and Knowledge in Action$
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Andrew Sturdy, Karen Handley, Timothy Clark, and Robin Fincham

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199212644

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212644.001.0001

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Conclusion—beyond consultancy and projects

Conclusion—beyond consultancy and projects

Chapter:
(p.172) 8 Conclusion—beyond consultancy and projects
Source:
Management Consultancy
Author(s):

Andrew Sturdy (Contributor Webpage)

Karen Handley (Contributor Webpage)

Timothy Clark (Contributor Webpage)

Robin Fincham (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212644.003.0008

Themes from earlier chapters are brought together to draw some wider conclusions for an understanding of client‐consultant relations and the flow of knowledge in consulting projects. Consultants and their clients are both seen as managerial agents located within various historical and structural relations simultaneously, which shift in significance through social interaction and negotiation. Here, formal contractual and organizational relations, roles and identities are crucial, but may be subsumed, suspended or translated by those associated with other physical, cultural and political boundaries. Pointers are given to the wider significance of the research for the fields of project working, professional or business services, inter‐organizational and project‐based learning and management knowledge and innovation. Finally, some of the limitations of the research are set out by way of identifying other empirical sites and conceptual themes which have potential to yield further insight into the various worlds of management consultancy.

Keywords:   management consultancy, further research, client‐consultant relations, learning

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