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Christ as MediatorA Study of the Theologies of Eusebius of Caesarea, Marcellus of Ancyra, and Athanasius of Alexandria$
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Jon M. Robertson

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199212606

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212606.001.0001

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Mediation in Athanasius of Alexandria

Mediation in Athanasius of Alexandria

Chapter:
(p.137) 4 Mediation in Athanasius of Alexandria
Source:
Christ as Mediator
Author(s):

Jon M. Robertson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212606.003.0005

This chapter demonstrates that Athanasius — as desirous of holding to a true monotheism as were others of his day — located the ‘oneness’ demanded by monotheism in the Godhead (or θέ οτης) within which a plurality of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit exists. This view substantially differed from that of Eusebius of Caesarea and was a considerable theological issue at stake in the ‘Arian’ controversy; an issue which affected liturgy, worship, and the very identification of Christianity as a type of monotheism. The chapter begins by inspecting an early argument for the divine unity proffered by Athanasius in the Contra Gentes. It then analyses Athanasius' view of the unity of the ‘Godhead’ (θέ οτης) in Contra Arianos I, II, and III.

Keywords:   divine unity, Contra Gentes, Contra Arianos, God, Father, Son, unity of the Godhead, Eusebius, Marcellus, image theology

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