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Education and Training in Europe$
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Giorgio Brunello, Pietro Garibaldi, and Etienne Wasmer

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199210978

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199210978.001.0001

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Higher Education, Innovation and Growth

Higher Education, Innovation and Growth

Chapter:
(p.56) 3 Higher Education, Innovation and Growth
Source:
Education and Training in Europe
Author(s):

Giorgia Brunello (Contributor Webpage)

Pietro Garibaldi (Contributor Webpage)

Etienne Wasmer

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199210978.003.0004

This chapter presents an overview and presents some suggestive evidence about the role of highly educated workers in promoting technological and scientific progress and as a consequence economic growth in Europe. The evidence on education and growth is reviewed, followed by a discussion on international migrations with an emphasis on highly-skilled scientists and engineers. Migration of human capital could be a viable and effective way of increasing supply of skills in Europe. However the migration channel in most cases has not worked to improve the skills of the European labour force. Finally, estimates on a so-called ‘dynamic effect’ of highly-educated and talented workers on the rate of scientific and technological innovation is discussed.

Keywords:   Europe, higher education, innovation, economic growth, brain drain, immigration, labour mobility

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