Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Witnesses to a World CrisisHistorians and Histories of the Middle East in the Seventh Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Howard-Johnston

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199208593

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199208593.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 10 December 2017

Later Historians: Theophanes

Later Historians: Theophanes

Chapter:
(p.268) 9 Later Historians: Theophanes
Source:
Witnesses to a World Crisis
Author(s):

James Howard‐Johnston

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199208593.003.0010

Theophanes' Chronographia is a rich repository of material culled from earlier sources, put together soon after 810. He made extensive use of George of Pisidia's official history of Heraclius' Persian campaigns and based his account of the period following the assassination of Constans II (669) on Theophilus of Edessa (in a Greek translation) and the early eighth‐century source also used (more sparingly) by Nicephorus. This last work is identified as the political memoirs of the Patrician Trajan. While Theophanes may have reworked what he transmits (when his religious principles or prejudices were activated) and had to allocate precise dates, if necessary by guesswork, to every event recorded (because of his annalistic format), he supplies much unique information, notably about military operations 624–8, the fall of Khusro, and the climactic phase in the battle between Byzantium and Islam (692–718).

Keywords:   Theophanes, George, Theophilus, Nicephorus, Trajan, Heraclius, Constans, Byzantium, Islam, annalistic

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .