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The Evolution of the European Convention on Human Rights
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The Evolution of the European Convention on Human Rights: From Its Inception to the Creation of a Permanent Court of Human Rights

Ed Bates

Abstract

The European Convention on Human Rights underwent a spectacular evolution over the first fifty years of its life. In recent times the European Court of Human Rights has been compared to a quasi-constitutional court for Europe in the field of human rights, and for some time the Convention has been viewed as a European Bill of Rights. The ‘coming of age’ of the ECHR system in the late 1990s was marked by the entry into force of Protocol 11, creating a new, full time Court. By contrast those who first proposed a European human rights guarantee were driven by an ambition to put in place a collecti ... More

Keywords: human rights, European Convention on Human Rights, European Human Rights Law, international human rights, United Kingdom, European Court of Human Rights, Europe, human rights guarantee

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2010 Print ISBN-13: 9780199207992
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199207992.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Ed Bates, author
Lecturer in Law, University of Southampton
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Contents

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PART I THE CONVENTION’s BIRTH

PART II FROM A SAFEGUARD AGAINST TOTALITARIANISM TO A FLEDGLING EUROPEAN BILL OF RIGHTS

PART III COMPLETING THE EUROPEAN BILL OF RIGHTS

PART IV ‘AFTER 1998’