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Cluster GenesisTechnology-Based Industrial Development$
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Pontus Braunerhjelm and Maryann P. Feldman

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199207183

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199207183.001.0001

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The Coevolution of Technologies and Institutions: Silicon Valley as the Iconic High-Technology Cluster

The Coevolution of Technologies and Institutions: Silicon Valley as the Iconic High-Technology Cluster

Chapter:
(p.38) 3 The Coevolution of Technologies and Institutions: Silicon Valley as the Iconic High-Technology Cluster
Source:
Cluster Genesis
Author(s):

Martin Kenney

Donald Patton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199207183.003.0003

This chapter considers the world's most iconic cluster: Silicon Valley. The emergence of Silicon Valley shares some features with the motion picture industry; both places experienced an inflow of entrepreneurs from other parts of the country and also saw a novel business model emerge. The environment that existed in the late 1950s, later known as Silicon Valley, was not unique; similar conditions existed in Boston and New York, for example. Both places were also influenced by policies — institutions in the motion picture case and governmental spending on defence in the Silicon Valley case. The partially random nature of the process is evidenced by the fact that William Shockley, one of the co-inventors of the transistor at Bell Labs in New Jersey and the founder of the first semiconductor firm, wanted to be near his mother.

Keywords:   process, entrepreneurs, institutions, serendipity, William Shockley

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