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Cluster GenesisTechnology-Based Industrial Development$
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Pontus Braunerhjelm and Maryann P. Feldman

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199207183

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199207183.001.0001

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Origins and Growth of the Hollywood Motion-Picture Industry: The First Three Decades

Origins and Growth of the Hollywood Motion-Picture Industry: The First Three Decades

Chapter:
(p.17) 2 Origins and Growth of the Hollywood Motion-Picture Industry: The First Three Decades
Source:
Cluster Genesis
Author(s):

Allen J. Scott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199207183.003.0002

This chapter analyses the forces that prompted a relocation in the early 20th century of the US film industry from New York to Hollywood. First, even though there were many other conceivable locations, Southern California was a suitable location for film production in the winter months due to the climate and the scenic landscape. Second, an unfavorable institutional set-up — particularly for independent motion producers — fostered a growing accumulation of movie production facilities in Hollywood. That led to various experiments, entry and exit, and created a sufficient agglomeration of activity (‘critical mass’) for take-off. Third, a new business model was invented. Thomas Ince, who arrived in 1911 in Southern California, established a new studio and re-organized the production process.

Keywords:   film industry, relocation, entrepreneurs, institutions, Thomas Ince, serendipity

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