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The Origins of BeowulfFrom Vergil to Wiglaf$
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Richard North

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199206612

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199206612.001.0001

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Ingeld’s Rival: Beowulf and Aeneas

Ingeld’s Rival: Beowulf and Aeneas

Chapter:
(p.100) 4 Ingeld’s Rival: Beowulf and Aeneas
Source:
The Origins of Beowulf
Author(s):

Richard North (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199206612.003.04

This chapter looks at Ingeld's marriage with Freawaru in the Scylding background of Beowulf. It is argued that Beowulf's victory over Grendel commends him to Danish nobles as the next king of Denmark, and that Hrothgar's offer to cherish Beowulf as a son offers him this through betrothal to Freawaru. Wealhtheow is discussed as prime mover of Freawaru's earlier betrothal to Ingeld, one which she forces Hrothgar to reaffirm. It is argued that the poet's model for his new story of Beowulf's place between Ingeld and Freawaru, against the initial disagreement between Hrothgar and Wealhtheow, is Aeneas' rivalry with Turnus over Lavinia against the division between Latinus and Amata in Vergil's Aeneid VII and IX. From this creation of rivalry in the bridal quest it is held that the poet of Beowulf thought himself no less a rival to the poet on Ingeld whose work he took as his source.

Keywords:   Aeneid, Amata, Freawaru, Hrothgar, Ingeld, Latinus, Lavinia, Turnus, Vergil

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