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The Evolving Reputation of Richard HookerAn Examination of Responses, 1600-1714$
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Michael Brydon

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199204816

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199204816.001.0001

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The Zenith and Slow Decline of Hooker as the Icon of Restoration Anglicanism

The Zenith and Slow Decline of Hooker as the Icon of Restoration Anglicanism

Chapter:
(p.123) 4 The Zenith and Slow Decline of Hooker as the Icon of Restoration Anglicanism
Source:
The Evolving Reputation of Richard Hooker
Author(s):

Michael Brydon

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199204816.003.0005

The Restoration cult of Hooker reached its climax under Charles I. It was challenged during the exclusion crisis, notably by Richard Baxter who claimed Hooker as a Reformed sympathizer and by Algernon Sidney who used the Polity to vest authority in the people, but the ultimate success of the royal party ensured they were swiftly marginalized. Instead, Hooker’s ecclesiastical image continued unchanged and works such as Pariarcha by Sir Robert Filmer ensured that Hooker’s royalist credentials were also bolstered.

Keywords:   Richard Baxter, Book VIII, Exclusion, John Locke, Patriarcha, nonconformists, presbyters, Algernon Sidney

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