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Beyond the Medieval VillageThe Diversification of Landscape Character in Southern Britain$
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Stephen Rippon

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199203826

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199203826.001.0001

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Champion and Woodland? Landscape Evolution beyond the Central Zone in Greater East Anglia

Champion and Woodland? Landscape Evolution beyond the Central Zone in Greater East Anglia

Chapter:
(p.138) 5 Champion and Woodland? Landscape Evolution beyond the Central Zone in Greater East Anglia
Source:
Beyond the Medieval Village
Author(s):

Stephen Rippon (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199203826.003.0005

This chapter considers a region that is termed ‘greater East Anglia’, embracing Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, and Cambridgeshire, which straddles the eastern edge of England's central zone characterized by villages and open fields. To the south of the Gipping and Lark valleys in Suffolk (i.e. southern Suffolk and Essex) there was a considerable degree of continuity between the Roman and medieval periods with no evidence for a major restructuring of the landscape. To the north, there was a significant change in how the landscape was exploited with a nucleation of settlement and intensification of agriculture around the eighth century. This emergence of villages—‐which is probably part of the same phenomenon seen in the East Midlands—‐was, however, short‐lived, and a greater degree of dispersion soon emerged in most areas.

Keywords:   Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, Cambridgeshire, continuity, discontinuity, ‘Middle Saxon shuffle’, dispersed settlement, villages, common fields

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