Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Roman Strigillated SarcophagiArt and Social History$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Janet Huskinson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199203246

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199203246.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 December 2018

Strigillated Sarcophagi and their Burial Contexts

Strigillated Sarcophagi and their Burial Contexts

Chapter:
(p.63) 4 Strigillated Sarcophagi and their Burial Contexts
Source:
Roman Strigillated Sarcophagi
Author(s):

Janet Huskinson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199203246.003.0004

This chapter reviews the placement of strigillated sarcophagi in tombs, to examine their likely visual impact. Given the diversity of tomb types in Rome and Ostia, and complex archaeology in many tombs which were used over generations, it concentrates on a few sites which preserve evidence for a considered display. The first examples are tombs which accommodated both cremation and inhumation burials, while the rest were used only for burials. The chapter concludes that these particular sites have certain common features, such as the placement of sarcophagi in specially designed niches and axial sight lines. Within them strigillated sarcophagi were particularly suited as memorials given their austere designs and inscription panels. Like other sarcophagi they were often hard to see in crowded tombs, and were occasionally interred below the floor, suggesting an ambivalence towards the human viewer; but even if invisible, their decoration remained important.

Keywords:   tomb types, conscious display, visibility, visual impact, viewer

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .