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Crime, Police, and Penal PolicyEuropean Experiences 1750-1940$
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Clive Emsley

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199202850

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199202850.001.0001

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The New French System

The New French System

Chapter:
(p.77) 5 The New French System
Source:
Crime, Police, and Penal Policy
Author(s):

Clive Emsley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199202850.003.0005

This chapter charts the way in which French revolutionaries reorganized the criminal law, courts, and punishment; how the Napoleonic Code consolidated the changes but also took a step back towards more repressive practices; and how many in rural society sought to use the new legislation in ways that best suited them. It explains further how French ideas informed criminal justice reform elsewhere. This was the case in territories incorporated into the French empire as well as among allies (specifically Bavaria, where a new Code was introduced) and enemies (specifically Britain, where debates about criminal law reform, prison, and punishment continued throughout the Revolutionary and Napoleonic period).

Keywords:   Bavarian Code, criminal law, courts, French Revolution, Napoleonic Code, prison, punishment

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