Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Isaiah Berlin and the Enlightenment$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Laurence Brockliss and Ritchie Robertson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198783930

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198783930.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 April 2019

Rococo Enlightenment? Berlin, Hamann, and Diderot

Rococo Enlightenment? Berlin, Hamann, and Diderot

Chapter:
(p.99) 7 Rococo Enlightenment? Berlin, Hamann, and Diderot
Source:
Isaiah Berlin and the Enlightenment
Author(s):

Marian Hobson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198783930.003.0008

Criticisms of the Enlightenment tend to neglect thought which is undoubtedly of the Enlightenment but which doesn’t fit in with what they have constructed. This tendency particularly affects Diderot: the range of his writings considered is almost always narrowed down, the problems of irony and tone they pose are often ignored. On a larger scale, the rococo is passed over, as if in embarrassment. Some of Diderot’s works can plausibly described be as ‘rococo’ and the paper tries to assess that term in relation to him. Moreover, it argues that something similar might be said of Hamann, whose interest in Diderot is sustained, in spite of the latter’s non-belief. The paper suggests that an abiding thread in the culture of the period is an often joking scepticism, which in both Diderot and Hamann is designed to create discomfort in the reader.

Keywords:   rococo, Hamann, Diderot, reason, instinct

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .