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Approaching the Roman RevolutionPapers on Republican History$
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Ronald Syme and Federico Santangelo

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198767060

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198767060.001.0001

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Caesar and Augustus in Virgil

Caesar and Augustus in Virgil

Chapter:
(p.230) 24 Caesar and Augustus in Virgil
Source:
Approaching the Roman Revolution
Author(s):

Ronald Syme

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198767060.003.0025

This paper provides a detailed discussion of the place of Julius Caesar in Virgil’s work and of the role that the memory of the former Dictator played in the Augustan period. Its main contention is that Virgil did share the unease with the legacy of Caesar that appears to characterise Octavian’s political discourse and much of the literary production of the Augustan period. The close reading of Virgil’s references to Caesar may therefore serve as a basis for wider conclusions on the formation and consolidation of consensus in the Triumviral and Augustan periods, and more generally on the reflection on late Republican history in that age.

Keywords:   Roman history, Roman Republic, Virgil, Julius Caesar, Octavian, Roman poetry, Roman politics, prosopography, social history, Servius

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