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Remembering the ReformationAn Inquiry into the Meanings of Protestantism$
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Thomas Albert Howard

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198754190

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198754190.001.0001

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1617, 1717

1617, 1717

Commemoration in a Confessional Age

Chapter:
(p.11) 1 1617, 1717
Source:
Remembering the Reformation
Author(s):

Thomas Albert Howard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198754190.003.0002

This chapter focuses on the first two centenary jubilees of the Reformation in 1617 and 1717 and argues that they are similar in many respects. It makes clear that these commemorations were largely restricted to German-speaking lands of the Holy Roman Empire. It also shows that these were highly confessional affairs, in which theologians, ecclesiastical figures, and secular princes worked together to commemorate the Reformation. Accordingly, the jubilees exhibited considerable confessional strife between Lutherans and Catholics, but also between Lutherans and Reformed Protestants. Finally, this chapter makes clear the central role the memory of Martin Luther and his 95 Theses played in these commemorations.

Keywords:   1617, 1717, 95 Theses, Martin Luther, Dream of Friedrich the Elector, Ulm, confessionalism, Wittenberg, Protestant League, Saxony

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