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Urban Craftsmen and Traders in the Roman World$
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Andrew Wilson and Miko Flohr

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198748489

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198748489.001.0001

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Roman Craftsmen and Traders: Towards an Intellectual History

Roman Craftsmen and Traders: Towards an Intellectual History

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 Roman Craftsmen and Traders: Towards an Intellectual History
Source:
Urban Craftsmen and Traders in the Roman World
Author(s):

Miko Flohr

Andrew Wilson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198748489.003.0002

This chapter discusses the development of the debate on craftsmen and traders in general terms, focusing specifically on the German and Anglo-Saxon scholarly traditions. It assesses the relative impact of new evidence and new ideas on discourse about Roman urban craftsmen and traders in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but it also highlights the key role played by certain individual scholars and their networks, such as Mommsen, Meyer, and Frank, in shaping the debate, as well as the impact of key political developments, particularly the First World War, which ended the German debate, and led to a prominence of US-based scholarship. Cultural developments in the 1960s paved the way for new approaches to the theme, and led to a debate dominated, for the first time, by British scholars.

Keywords:   Roman craftsmen, Roman traders, Roman economy, Theodor Mommsen, Eduard Meyer, Tenney Frank, Mikhail Rostovtzeff, Moses Finley, A. H. M. Jones, consumer city debate

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