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Urban Craftsmen and Traders in the Roman World$
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Andrew Wilson and Miko Flohr

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198748489

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198748489.001.0001

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The Potters of Ancient Sagalassos Revisited

The Potters of Ancient Sagalassos Revisited

Chapter:
(p.377) 16 The Potters of Ancient Sagalassos Revisited
Source:
Urban Craftsmen and Traders in the Roman World
Author(s):

Jeroen Poblome

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198748489.003.0017

This chapter discusses the urban history of the potters’ quarter at Sagalassos. Production of red glazed fine-ware pottery started here in the Augustan period, probably as a result of a concerted effort by the community to move a pre-existing Hellenistic potters’ quarter from the place where the Roman odeon now stands. Production continued until the sixth century AD. The chapter outlines how the area gradually became more densely built up, and became dominated by small-scale pottery workshops: local economic circumstances left little room for investment on a larger scale. The analysis shows the impact that a locally important craft could have on the urban landscape—even if the Roman imperial potters’ quarter was not directly in the city centre.

Keywords:   Roman craftsmen, Roman traders, Roman economy, Roman Anatolia, Sagalassos, pottery production, commercial landscape, clustering

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