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Urban Craftsmen and Traders in the Roman World$
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Andrew Wilson and Miko Flohr

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198748489

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198748489.001.0001

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Women, Trade, and Production in Urban Centres of Roman Italy

Women, Trade, and Production in Urban Centres of Roman Italy

Chapter:
(p.200) 9 Women, Trade, and Production in Urban Centres of Roman Italy
Source:
Urban Craftsmen and Traders in the Roman World
Author(s):

Lena Larsson Lovén

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198748489.003.0010

This chapter discusses the position of women in urban professional networks. While female work tends often to remain much less visible in our textual and iconographic sources, there is sufficient evidence to make it clear that women played a crucial role in many sectors of urban economies. Often, however, they did so within a family business that, publicly, was mostly associated with their husbands. Thus, while men were often commemorated with reference to their occupational identity, their wives were not. The chapter suggests that many epigraphically attested working women were actually working in rather exceptional contexts, implying that occupations with which these women were commonly associated give a false impression of what women’s work was like.

Keywords:   Roman craftsmen, Roman traders, Roman economy, gender, women, textile production

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