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The Penultimate CuriosityHow Science Swims in the Slipstream of Ultimate Questions$
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Roger Wagner and Andrew Briggs

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198747956

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198747956.001.0001

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Imposed Silence

Imposed Silence

Chapter:
(p.160) Chapter Nineteen Imposed Silence
Source:
The Penultimate Curiosity
Author(s):

Roger Wagner

Andrew Briggs

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198747956.003.0019

This chapter begins by briefly considering the person Roger Bacon was referring to when he claimed that the most beautiful parts of philosophy were those that he may have learned from a mysterious French soldier known as Pierre de Maricourt or Petrus Peregrinus (Peter the Pilgrim). It then turns to how the Church’s control of doctrine affected the whole future relationship of science and religion. It discusses the use of state violence to ensure religious conformity. The Pope began to appoint ‘inquisitors’ or judges to try individual cases of heresy. The newly established Dominican and Franciscan orders seemed to some to have been providentially supplied for just this purpose.

Keywords:   Roger Bacon, Peter the Pilgrim, church, science, religion, Christianity, state violence, inquisition, heresy

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