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The Penultimate CuriosityHow Science Swims in the Slipstream of Ultimate Questions$
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Roger Wagner and Andrew Briggs

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198747956

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198747956.001.0001

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The Creation of the World

The Creation of the World

Chapter:
(p.119) Chapter Fourteen The Creation of the World
Source:
The Penultimate Curiosity
Author(s):

Roger Wagner

Andrew Briggs

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198747956.003.0014

This chapter focusses on Philoponus’ book De Opificio Mundi—On the Creation of the World—a commentary on the Genesis account of creation. While one thrust of the book is to refute the criticisms of Genesis made by his pagan philosophical colleagues, a larger part is directed against the kind of interpretations of Genesis put forward by some fellow Christians. The crux of his dispute with the former concerned the nature and purpose of God’s relationship with the physical world. The heart of his argument with the latter turned on the nature and purpose of God’s Holy Scriptures. The chapter also considers Philoponus’ other theological writings, where he attempted to bring a philosophical clarity to two of the most vexed theological issues of the time: the nature of Christ and the nature of the Trinity.

Keywords:   John Philoponus, Creation, Genesis, Christians, God, Scripture, pagans, Christ, Trinity

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