Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Søren KierkegaardSubjectivity, Irony, & the Crisis of Modernity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jon Stewart

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198747703

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198747703.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 24 June 2018

Kierkegaard’s Socratic Task and the Development of the Pseudonymous Works: 1844–6

Kierkegaard’s Socratic Task and the Development of the Pseudonymous Works: 1844–6

Chapter:
(p.132) 7 Kierkegaard’s Socratic Task and the Development of the Pseudonymous Works: 1844–6
Source:
Søren Kierkegaard
Author(s):

Jon Stewart

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198747703.003.0008

This chapter explores Kierkegaard’s books Philosophical Fragments, The Concept of Anxiety, Prefaces, Stages on Life’s Way, and the Concluding Unscientific Postscript. These books present a complex series of works ostensibly authored by different pseudonyms. We see that many of the main motifs concerning Socrates that Kierkegaard originally treated in The Concept of Irony now reappear in different contexts. This is particularly interesting when we consider that these works treat important Christian concepts such as the incarnation, the revelation, faith, sin, and forgiveness. Surprisingly Kierkegaard believes that the pagan Socrates has some important insights for Christians today. This chapter also highlights Kierkegaard’s polemic with Heiberg and his conflict with the satirical journal The Corsair. The chapter ends with a discussion of the Concluding Unscientific Postscript, and explores Kierkegaard’s conception of a parallel authorship that features a series of pseudonymous works that run alongside a series of signed works.

Keywords:   Kierkegaard, Socrates, Philosophical Fragments, The Concept of Anxiety, Prefaces, Stages on Life’s Way, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, Christianity

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .