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The Child as MusicianA handbook of musical development$
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Gary E. McPherson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198744443

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198744443.001.0001

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Historical perspectives

Historical perspectives

Chapter:
(p.523) Chapter 28 Historical perspectives
Source:
The Child as Musician
Author(s):

Gordon Cox

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198744443.003.0028

The aim of this chapter is to focus upon children’s experience of learning music in formal educational settings during different periods of Western history. Four examples are provided, including the English medieval song schools, private instrumental instruction in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century England, school music teaching in late nineteenth-century Europe, and recapitulation and musical childhood in twentieth-century America and Britain. The first three of these case studies illustrate children’s musical experiences in the formal settings of churches, studios, and schools, respectively, whilst the fourth charts the progress of an influential theory concerning the development of music and the evolutionary stages of childhood. Through such an exploration of the historical constructions of musical childhoods, music educators should become aware of the cultural influences that impinge on the experience of childhood, and more specifically understand better how children can be encouraged to fulfill their musical potential.

Keywords:   song schools, learning music, private instrumental instruction, school music teaching, musical childhood, music educators, musical potential

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