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Actors and Agency in Global Social Governance$
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Alexandra Kaasch and Kerstin Martens

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198743996

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198743996.001.0001

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Slowly Succeeding—G20 Social Policy Governance

Slowly Succeeding—G20 Social Policy Governance

Chapter:
(p.153) Chapter 8 Slowly Succeeding—G20 Social Policy Governance
Source:
Actors and Agency in Global Social Governance
Author(s):

John Kirton

Julia Kulik

Caroline Bracht

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198743996.003.0008

As many countries struggle to overcome the economic and social costs of the 2008 global financial crisis, social policy has become central in many states, and thus an issue for global governance forums such as the G20. Its first eight summits, while focused on macro-economic and financial policy, steadily enhanced their governance of social policy. In its deliberation, decision-making, delivery, and domestic political management, the G20 has become more effective, even adjusting the national policies and practice of its members. By the fifth summit, in Seoul in 2010, leaders in their private discussions had created a causal model combining social and socio-economic policy. However, despite advances at the St Petersburg Summit in 2013, the G20 has yet to put social policy at centre stage. This G20 social policy performance is explained by the model of systemic hub governance.

Keywords:   G20, global governance, social policy, employment, compliance

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