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SensoramaA Phenomenalist Analysis of Spacetime and Its Contents$
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Michael Pelczar

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198732655

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198732655.001.0001

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Phenomenal duration, succession, and change

Phenomenal duration, succession, and change

Chapter:
(p.56) 3 Phenomenal duration, succession, and change
Source:
Sensorama
Author(s):

Michael Pelczar

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198732655.003.0003

The central thesis of Chapter 3 is that introspection gives us no reason to think that any aspect of our conscious experience is characterized by objective temporal succession: that introspection yields no evidence of changing or enduring sensations, and no evidence of any sequential instantiation of qualia. This goes against a long tradition, upheld by philosophers as divergent in outlook as Kant and Mill, according to which we have direct and incontrovertible evidence that conscious experience persists and changes over time. Breaking with this tradition is an important first step toward recognizing the possibility that conscious experience is not a temporal phenomenon at all—and consequently to the possibility that consciousness might serve as a suitable basis for the metaphysical reduction of temporal phenomena, including time (or spacetime) itself.

Keywords:   phenomenal duration, phenomenal succession, phenomenal change

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