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Basic X-Ray Scattering for Soft Matter$
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Wim H. de Jeu

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198728665

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198728665.001.0001

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Diffraction Physics: Scattering by Crystals

Diffraction Physics: Scattering by Crystals

Chapter:
(p.54) 4 Diffraction Physics: Scattering by Crystals
Source:
Basic X-Ray Scattering for Soft Matter
Author(s):

Wim H. de Jeu

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198728665.003.0004

In this chapter diffraction by crystals is considered, the heart of classical crystallography. This is a vast topic and specific choices have to be made, keeping applications to soft matter in mind. The first section summarizes basic elements of crystallography, without going into detailed symmetry considerations. The heart of the chapter is a discussion of diffraction by a crystal lattice, which includes a further discussion of the Ewald sphere and the attendant concept of reciprocal space. After treating some practical aspects of scattering by a crystal, the chapter finishes with a case study of polymer crystallization.

Keywords:   lattice plane, crystal system, Miller indices, reciprocal space, lattice sum, mosaic spread, Debye-Waller factor, line width, powder diffraction, polymer crystallization

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