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Colonial America and the Earl of Halifax, 1748–1761$
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Andrew D. M. Beaumont

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198723974

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198723974.001.0001

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The Means to an End, 1749–52

The Means to an End, 1749–52

Chapter:
(p.69) 3 The Means to an End, 1749–52
Source:
Colonial America and the Earl of Halifax, 1748–1761
Author(s):

Andrew D. M. Beaumont

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198723974.003.0004

This chapter explores the collateral effects of Halifax’s success in Nova Scotia upon his relationship with his patron, the duke of Bedford, and with other members of the ministry. The chapter reveals how Bedford’s rivalry with the duke of Newcastle threatened Halifax’s newfound authority, while his attempts to restrict the board’s effectiveness undermined their relationship and forced Halifax into breaking from his patronage. The chapter examines the role Halifax played in engineering Bedford’s removal, and the rewards he received as a result from the Privy Council in March 1752. The chapter concludes by examining Halifax’s board following its empowerment, and its selective prioritization of plans in the national interest over those of private groups.

Keywords:   Nova Scotia, patronage, Bedford (John Russell, Duke of), Sandwich (John Montagu, Earl of), Newcastle (Thomas Pelham-Holles, Duke of), intrigue, Privy Council

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