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The Rise and Fall of Ergativity in AramaicCycles of Alignment Change$

Eleanor Coghill

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198723806

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198723806.001.0001

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Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

Source:
The Rise and Fall of Ergativity in Aramaic
Author(s):

Eleanor Coghill

Publisher:
Oxford University Press

For the cases from the Peshitta, for the reader’s interest, it is also shown whether Qṭil li is also found in the equivalent verse in the earlier Old Syriac Gospels (as attested in the Curetonian and Sinaitic manuscripts: Bensly, Harris, and Burkitt 1894; Burkitt 1904). This is not to assume that there were not other cases in the Old Syriac Gospels which did not survive into the Peshitta version. In fact, there is at least one such case, example (8a) in Appendix B.

New Testament Peshitta (earliest manuscripts fifth century AD, but much of the text possibly very early)3

(1)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

45

(p.307) Book of the Laws of Countries (before fourth century AD)6

(2)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

(p.308) Doctrine of Addai (fifth century AD)7

(3)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

(p.309)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

(p.310)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

8

Martyrdom of Barsamya (probably fifth century AD)9

(4)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

(p.311) Kalila and Dimna: Chapter of the Ox and the Lion (probably sixth century AD)10

(5)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

(p.312)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

(p.313)

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

111213

Notes:

(3) The precise dating of the Peshitta gospels is uncertain. Joosten (1996: 22) argues that much of the text comes from Diatesseron gospels, dated to the second century, which is very early for Syriac.

(4) Curetonian Old Syriac: w-ʔāp̄lā sʕir leh meddem d-mawtā ‘and moreover he has not done anything (deserving) of death.’ The Sinaitic is virtually the same (ʔāp̄lā sʕir leh meddem d-mawtā).

(5) Curetonian Old Syriac: hānnā ḏēn ʔʾāp̄ lā meddem da-snē ʕḇiḏ leh ‘But this man has also done nothing wrong.’ The Sinaitic is the same except for an orthographic detail. Note that in the equivalent section of Mark 15:14 (in the Peshitta and the Sinaitic Old Syriac version—it is missing in the Curetonian), Pilate says:

Appendix A: All cases of Qṭil li from the Syriac Corpus (see §6.6)

(6) Muraoka (2005: 144).

(7) Muraoka (2005: 145).

(8) The l- in this example was interpreted by Phillips in his translation (1876: 11) as a dative (‘for us’), but could equally well be understood in the context as an agent, as in the subsequent example, where Phillips interprets the l- as an agent.

(9) Segal 1970: 82: ‘The Acts of Sharbil, Babai, and Barsamya were probably composed after the time of Ephraim of Edessa (died 373), and after a Syriac Calendar of 411, in which Sharbil and Barsamya are not mentioned, but possibly before Rabbula’s time (died 435 or 436), and certainly before Jacob of Serug (died 521).’

(10) Bickell and Benfey (1876: xii–xiii).

(11) In the main text (1514) Schulthess has ‘corrected’ the form found in the manuscripts from a Qṭil li to a Qṭal (Suffix Conjugation) construction. Cf. Brockelmann (1913: 127).

(12) Schulthess made the same ‘correction’ as in the example above. Only šmiʕ li is found in the four manuscripts.

(13) The phrase mpaššḥ-in l-hon in this text is ambiguous in form, as mpaššḥ-in could be either an active or a passive mpl. participle, and l-hon could be either the object or the agent (both of which are 3pl.). Schulthess appears to read it as a Qṭil li construction in his translation, which uses a passive: ‘Denn auch die Fruchtbäume, die mit Früchten schwer beladen sind, werden manchmal von diesen geknickt’ [For the fruit trees, which are weighed down with fruit, are sometimes snapped by these]. However, one would expect a resultative interpretation with Qṭil li, which does not make sense in this context, so I take the active participle reading and do not count this phrase as Qṭil li. The structure of the text is in any case problematic: the presence of both kaḏ ‘when, while’ and wa- ‘and’ is difficult to explain.