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Our Lady of the NationsApparitions of Mary in 20th-Century Catholic Europe$
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Chris Maunder

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198718383

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718383.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.194) 16 Conclusion
Source:
Our Lady of the Nations
Author(s):

Chris Maunder

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718383.003.0016

The conclusion summarizes the work by listing the contexts that provide the ground for the alternative history of apparition cults: times of persecution; the threat of communism; social and moral change. More recently, the Internet has given the apparition devotees greater opportunities to spread messages. The major theme of the apparitions has remained the same throughout these changing circumstances: an urgent call to faith and warnings of future punishments for sin. Whereas the traditional focus for apparitions was the shrine, it has in some cases been replaced by the visionaries when they travel the world and experience apparitions anywhere. This chapter concludes that apparitions continue to be signs of the maternal presence of Mary and her concern for the world.

Keywords:   visionaries, apparitions, shrines, pilgrimage, Catholicism

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