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Our Lady of the NationsApparitions of Mary in 20th-Century Catholic Europe$
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Chris Maunder

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198718383

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718383.001.0001

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The Cold War and the Marian Cult

The Cold War and the Marian Cult

Chapter:
(p.122) 11 The Cold War and the Marian Cult
Source:
Our Lady of the Nations
Author(s):

Chris Maunder

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718383.003.0011

The period 1947–54 is the high point of the Marian apparition cult in the twentieth century in terms of numbers of new cases. William Christian has shown how this related to concerns over the Cold War, with communism gaining ground in countries such as France and Italy, and Soviet Russia occupying half of Europe. For this reason, many apparitions echoed the anti-communist revelations of Fátima. The obvious political reference did not help the cause of most of these apparitions with the Church. Nevertheless, popular support has meant that several shrines and their messages have survived, notably in Italy, Germany, and France. Some have gained the status of official shrines, even though the apparitions remain unapproved. In the 1950s, there was evidence of a new shift in Catholic concern, where American consumerism and liberalism begins to take its effect on Catholic culture.

Keywords:   shrine, communism, Italy, Germany, France

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