Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
European Social Models From Crisis to CrisisEmployment and Inequality in the Era of Monetary Integration$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jon Erik Dølvik and Andrew Martin

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198717966

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198717966.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 September 2018

The Evolution and Crises of the Social Models in Italy and Spain

The Evolution and Crises of the Social Models in Italy and Spain

Chapter:
(p.177) 6 The Evolution and Crises of the Social Models in Italy and Spain
Source:
European Social Models From Crisis to Crisis
Author(s):

Sofia Pérez

Martin Rhodes

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198717966.003.0006

Traditionally identified as sharing a common “Southern model” of welfare capitalism and subject to a similar “Southern syndrome” of low employment and productivity growth, Italy and Spain are the largest of the Eurozone’s debtor countries to be swept up in its sovereign debt crisis. Despite similar starting points, we observe important contrasts in the development of the two social models, as well as dissimilar political contexts and macroeconomic constraints as they joined the Eurozone. These differences help explain their contrasting labor-market experiences, with Spain undergoing far greater employment creation and destruction than Italy. Social-model distinctions combined with different domestic political scenarios implied a much faster adoption of structural reforms in Spain compared to Italy. Italy was able to adapt its existing institutional arsenal—notably in work-time sharing during the crisis—to postpone the degree of labor-market upheaval experienced in Spain.

Keywords:   Italy, Spain, welfare capitalism, labor market, unemployment, work-time sharing, Eurozone, sovereign debt crisis, social model, debtor states

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .