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Handbook of ValuePerspectives from Economics, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Psychology and Sociology$
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Tobias Brosch and David Sander

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198716600

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716600.001.0001

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What is value? Where does it come from? A philosophical perspective

What is value? Where does it come from? A philosophical perspective

Chapter:
(p.3) Chapter 1 What is value? Where does it come from? A philosophical perspective
Source:
Handbook of Value
Author(s):

Christine Tappolet

Mauro Rossi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716600.003.0001

Are values objective or subjective? To clarify this question the chapter begins with an overview of the main concepts and debates in the philosophy of values, such as cognitivism and non-cognitivism. It then discusses the arguments for and against value realism, the thesis that there are objective evaluative facts. By contrast with value anti-realism, which is generally associated with sentimentalism, according to which evaluative judgments are grounded in sentiments, value realism is commonly coupled with rationalism. Against this common view, it is argued that value realism can be combined with sentimentalism, and it is suggested that a plausible account, called “sentimental realism,” and according to which evaluative judgments are closely related to emotions and motivation, can be developed.

Keywords:   anti-realism, cognitivism, emotion, motivation, non-cognitivism, objectivity, rationalism, realism, sentimentalism, subjectivity

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