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Being, Freedom, and MethodThemes from the Philosophy of Peter van Inwagen$
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John A. Keller

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198715702

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198715702.001.0001

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Why Isn’t There More Progress in Philosophy?

Why Isn’t There More Progress in Philosophy?

Chapter:
(p.277) 14 Why Isn’t There More Progress in Philosophy?
Source:
Being, Freedom, and Method
Author(s):

David J. Chalmers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198715702.003.0016

Is there progress in philosophy? A What might be called a glass-half-full view of philosophical progress is that there is some progress in philosophy. The glass-half-empty view is that there is not as much as we would like. Inspired in part by van Inwagen’s discussion of disagreement in philosophy, this paper articulates and argues for a thesis about the relative lack of progress in philosophy: there has been less convergence to the truth on the big questions of philosophy than on the big questions of the hard sciences. It then investigates the question of what explains this relative lack of progress. The paper considers a number of explanations and argues that none of them (alone or together) is fully adequate. It then articulates a form that an adequate explanation might take.

Keywords:   metaphilosophy, success, progress, van Inwagen, disagreement, convergencephilosophical method

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