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Expressing Our AttitudesExplanation and Expression in Ethics, Volume 2$
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Mark Schroeder

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198714149

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714149.001.0001

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Two Roles for Propositions

Two Roles for Propositions

Cause for Divorce?

Chapter:
(p.75) 3 Two Roles for Propositions
Source:
Expressing Our Attitudes
Author(s):

Mark Schroeder

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714149.003.0004

Nondescriptivist theories in many domains are often characterized as dispensing with the idea that declarative sentences in those domains express propositions. This chapter argues that this conception is mistaken, and that such theories—or at least, the only plausible such theories—must instead be understood as adopting surprising views about the nature of propositions. Such views will divorce the core theoretical roles for propositions—being the objects of the attitudes and the bearers of truth and falsity—from some of the more peripheral roles that propositions have also been traditionally thought to play, such as determining truth-conditions, being representational, and being the proper objects of excluded middle.

Keywords:   propositions, attitudes, Frege-Geach problem, nondescriptivism, truth

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