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Implementation and World PoliticsHow International Norms Change Practice$
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Alexander Betts and Phil Orchard

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198712787

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198712787.001.0001

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Status Determination and Recognition

Status Determination and Recognition

Chapter:
(p.248) 14 Status Determination and Recognition
Source:
Implementation and World Politics
Author(s):

Anna Schmidt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198712787.003.0014

The treaty norms of the international refugee regime define refugees and their specific rights. Policy norms regarding refugee status determination thus becomes a core technology for overall regime effectiveness. The chapter analyses this using the cases of Tanzania and Uganda during the last decade. Here, given broadly similar levels of international “institutionalization, ” practices varied widely both across and within each country. “Implementation” was affected by broader structural factors, including democratization and regional politics. But these were also reshaped by the localized configurations of the “international refugee regime”, i.e. the refugee assistance set up by UNHCR, state actors, and international and national NGOs. In this process no actor could impose their interest consistently and no single resource—material transfers, the rule of law, moral clout or information flows—was dominant. Based on the overall nature of governance emerging from the case studies and the multi-level factors at play, the chapter suggests a sociologically informed recasting of the difference between implementation and institutionalization.

Keywords:   refugee status determination, implementation, Tanzania, Uganda, UNHCR

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