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Spiritual RationalityPapal Embargo as Cultural Practice$
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Stefan K. Stantchev

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198704096

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198704096.001.0001

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Trade with Saracens Endangers the Soul

Trade with Saracens Endangers the Soul

Formation and Implications of a Legal Discourse

Chapter:
(p.41) 2 Trade with Saracens Endangers the Soul
Source:
Spiritual Rationality
Author(s):

Stefan K. Stantchev

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198704096.003.0003

Chapters 2 and 3 discuss the formation of embargo as a policy and a discourse in 1179–1250s against multiple backgrounds: development of continental common law, emergence of the penitential forum, and papal policies on Christians’ relations with others. Chapter 2 explains the legal structure of the embargo aimed at Muslims and exposes the hierarchy of papal concerns it reflected. The establishment of a degree of papal jurisdiction over Christians’s trade with Muslims was an issue of ‘proper order’ within Christendom inherently intertwined with the pastoral concern with the control over—and the salvation of souls. Second came a concern with the sustenance of Christian communities interwoven with the papacy’s need to accommodate their interests. The effect that Christian trade could have on Muslim military power thus yielded to ‘domestic’ concerns. Given the conceptual and empirical challenges involved, categorical positions on the embargo’s impact on trade flows are not sustainable.

Keywords:   embargo, export controls, contraband, papacy, Canon law, trade, Mediterranean, penance, Saracens

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